Designing a custom logo stamp in Fusion 360

Stamp cover photo

In search for a unique way that I can brand the packaging that I send out to my 3D Hubs customers, I came across this video by Devin Montez on his Make Anything Youtube channel. After watching this, I decided to design and print my own stamp. This post will cover the design process, and the post for the actual print will be up soon!

I first started by modelling the handle. The print will be done with the bottom part in TPU filament, and the handle section printed in PLA on top of that. The handle was fairly simple, just a profile sketch and revolution. A handy tip – to ensure the top surface is a smooth curve and not a point or divot once you revolve, you can horizontally constrain the tangent of the curve at the top point as shown below:

Horizontal constraint demo

Once I sketched out the whole profile and revolved it, these were the results. I was really happy with how similar it looks to a classical stamp handle!

Revolved handle sketch

The next step after this was to move on to bringing the logo design into Fusion. I already had my logo designed as an Adobe Illustrator file, so from there I exported it as an SVG.

If your logo is a picture and has clear lines and boundaries between shapes, you can still convert this into a vector graphic and save it as an SVG with good results. You can do this using an online image converter, Inkscape, or Adobe Illustrator. I’m sure there are also other ways of doing it but those are the most common. In Illustrator, the tool to use is called Image Trace and it’s something that I use a lot.

I brought the SVG into Fusion using Insert > Insert SVG. Then I just had to adjust some offsets and add some fillets to make sure the clearances were alright and it printed well, and also add the border circles.

Logo sketch

I then extruded the sections that I wanted to be stamped out by 5 mm, and added 2 mm of thickness to the back panel too.

Extruded logo

Now it’s really starting to take shape! The final step for the logo section was to add a draft angle of 30 degrees to each detail. This is good practice in this case for a few reasons. Since this section will be printed in TPU, it’s a good idea to stiffen up the tin sections with some additional support. This will make sure that the thin line making up the “M” in the logo doesn’t move around when pressed down. It also increases the contact area between these thin sections and the main back plate, making sure that it sticks well.

Drafted extruded logo

Finally, the handle and logo part just need to be aligned together and the stamp is complete! You can combine the two bodies together if you wish to have one complete STL, or keep them separate if you’d like to export them as separate files. I added some colours to differentiate between the two parts and that’s it!

Final stamp design

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